How technology drives services


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Technology has changed all our lives, and mostly for the better. But the question will always remain; does the technology change our habits, or do our changing habits encourage the development of the technology?

Certainly some technologies arrive and then find a use, for example SMS text messaging. However, a lot of technology is developed as a response to a challenge. Within the world of security the latter is more often the case with technologies developed to provide specific solutions.

As these technologies arrive and find a place in the security toolkit, so they also integrate better with each other to provide a more comprehensive and effective solution. This, ironically, has the subsequent effect of opening up an opportunity to change the ‘habit’ of security and how it is delivered. With more effective technology supporting the security supplier so the security supplier has been able to broaden the offer to encompass tasks that previously were outside their remit. And this has the effect of making security itself more integrated into the customer organisation.

Today security is about so much more than simply guarding and safeguarding property. It is about providing a more pleasant and attractive experience for both the organisation and its visitors. The days of the man in a peaked cap are over and today’s security professional is increasingly the first point of contact for visitors; helping to advise and guide visitors to where they need to go. In this respect, the gap between front-of-house reception and security has closed. This actually helps in the delivery of the traditional security function. If the security person has a better view of who is going where on site, they are less likely to be surprised by stray people wandering where they don’t need to be. The whole system works much more smoothly.

For the organisation this is a big advantage. In times of austerity it has been necessary for many organisations to downsize and make economies in the way they are managed and presented. While this has an obvious benefit on cost, it also comes at a cost, with a poorer client facing experience. And in a time when competition for business is increased, few organisations can afford a weaker experience. Security will always be a necessary function, so it is logical that security adds value by restating the missing experience factor. More and more businesses are learning this. Isn’t it remarkable what new technology can do?

As appeared in Premises & Facilities Management Magazine www.pfmonthenet.net/

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